Construction Cost Inflation Estimate

The Development Impact Fee Reform and Deferral Program require that the Capital Planning Program (CPP) develop and the Capital Planning Committee approve an Annual Infrastructure Construction Cost Inflation Estimate (AICCIE) used to estimate the rise in construction costs within San Francisco. For the 2017 calendar year, the CPP recommended a rate of 5% which was approved by the Capital Planning Committee (CPC) on October 17, 2016.

AICCIE 2017 Presentation to CPC

CPC 2017 Memorandum

For the 2017 calendar year, the CPP recommended a rate of 5% which was approved by the Capital Planning Committee (CPC) on October 17, 2016.

AICCIE 2016 Presentation to CPC

CPC 2016 Memorandum

For the 2016 calendar year, the CPP recommended a rate of 5% which was approved by the Capital Planning Committee (CPC) on October 19, 2015.

AICCIE 2015 Presentation to CPC

CPC 2015 Memorandum

For the 2015 calendar year, the CPP recommended a rate of 5% which was approved by the Capital Planning Committee (CPC) on October 20, 2014.

AICCIE 2014 Presentation to CPC

CPC 2014 Memorandum

For the 2014 calendar year, the CPP recommended a rate of 4.5% which was approved by the Capital Planning Committee (CPC) on October 21, 2013.

AICCIE 2013 Presentation to CPC

CPC 2013 Memorandum

For the 2013 calendar year, the CPP recommended a rate of 4% which was approved by the Capital Planning Committee (CPC) on October 15, 2012.

AICCIE 2012 Presentation to CPC

CPC 2012 Memorandum

For the 2012 calendar year, the CPP recommended a rate of 3.25% which was approved by the Capital Planning Committee (CPC) on November 28, 2011.

AICCIE-2011-CPC-Presentation

CPC 2011 Memorandum

CPC Meeting – November 28, 2011

Capital Planning Committee
AGENDA FOR MEETING
November 28, 2011
City Hall, Room 305
12:00 – 2:00 PM Continue reading CPC Meeting – November 28, 2011

Voters Approve Road Repaving and Street Safety Bond

It’s smooth paving ahead! Sixty-eight percent of voters in Tuesday’s election approved the Road Repaving and Street Safety Bond (Measure B).  This means that San Francisco’s street and roadway network will be getting some much needed TLC over the next several years. While the bulk of bond proceeds will be used to repave or reconstruct deteriorating streets, funds will also go towards implementing city wide pedestrian & bicycle safety improvements, increasing sidewalk accessibility, upgrading traffic signal infrastructure and strengthening bridges, overpasses and stairways.  In short, all street users — regardless of their preferred mode of transportation — will be getting something.

In addition to making our city’s street network stronger, safer and more resilient, the passage of this bond assures future savings by making repairs before they become more costly.  When it comes to streets, repairs can only be deferred for so long before their cost becomes significantly higher (not to mention the increase in safety issues that arise).  Because many of our streets are approaching the point where repair costs jump dramatically, using bond proceeds to address deteriorating street conditions now allows the city to avoid paying up to five times the cost in the future.

An added bonus is that the Road Repaving and Street Safety bond adheres to the City’s 10-year Capital Plan policy of only issuing new bonds as old ones are paid off.  That means the City will be delivering these improvements without raising the tax rate.

You can visit the Department of Public Works website to learn to more about the Bond. You can also learn more about street conditions and financing on our website.

Seismic Projects and Fall Newsletter

We’ve created a new page that focuses on our seismic projects since Loma Prieta, so check it out if you haven’t seen it.  And in case you missed it, our fall newsletter is out and discusses progress on SF General Hospital, Libraries, and Neighborhood Fire Stations.

Please don’t forget to visit 72hours.org for great ideas on improving your own earthquake preparedness!

Shake Shake Shake…

Making Progress: Over 190 Projects Since Loma Prieta

The City and County of San Francisco has completed over 190 projects with seismic components or replacements of public facilities in the 22 years since the October 17th, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. These projects include: small but critical pump stations and transmission mains; essential facilities such as police and fire stations; signature properties like City Hall, the Ferry Building, and the Main Library; our Academy of Sciences, Asian Art, and DeYoung Museums; and the International Terminal at SFO.

An additional 34 public projects or programs are currently in progress, including the San Francisco General Hospital rebuild; the modernization of branch libraries; renovations of our neighborhood parks and recreation centers; and the seismic retrofit of our drinking water system from Hetch Hetchy Valley to the taps of 2.5 million regional customers.

Check out the map of these improvements below — note that regional and utility sites are not displayed.

Map of Projects | List of Projects Since Loma Prieta (PDF)

Building a Resilient City: Reducing the Probability of Failure As Well As Its Consequences

When complete, the 224 projects mentioned above will contribute to the City’s ability not only to withstand a major seismic event but also to recover from and to continue operating after it. The 15 violent seconds of the Loma Prieta earthquake killed 63 people and caused an estimated $10 billion in infrastructure damage (current $s). But it also had significant long-term effects, from temporary closure of the Bay Bridge to removal of the Cypress and Embarcadero freeways. A seismic event the magnitude of the 1906 earthquake would cause vastly greater devastation, causing both short- and long-term impacts akin to Hurricane Katrina’s physical and economic destruction in New Orleans.

Looking Ahead: Strategic Investments Through Long-Range Capital Planning

Through its ten-year Capital Plan, the City and County of San Francisco is looking ahead to address its remaining infrastructure needs.   The recently approved Earthquake Safety and Emergency Response Bond that addresses the Police Department Headquarters, portions of the City’s high-pressure fire hydrant system (or Auxiliary Water Supply System) and neighborhood fire stations is an important step forward.  However, we still have a ways to go and recommend you check out our Capital Plan or the web summary for more details.